Consistent Effort Leads to Consistent Visibility

How do you become a household name? The simple answer: by relentlessly getting your message out, by generating publicity for yourself, by finding new ways to package information.

While this can be a time-consuming activity, having a monthly goal can keep you moving forward. Here are some basic activities to include:

Find a role model. Several are even better. They don’t have to be experts in your field, but they do have to be experts that you admire. Analyze how they’ve built their careers. It’s fascinating to see how others have done it — and it makes the process seem less daunting.

Have a current photograph taken — one you really like. People will remember you more easily if they have a face to connect with a name. When you have a picture you like, put it on your brochure, offer it to publications that are printing your articles, use it on flyers for seminars and events, and post it on your web site.

Compile a media mailing list. Keep adding to it as you find new sources that might be appropriate for you. Include local and national newspapers and magazines, names of reporters who write about your field, and radio and television interview programs that use experts as guests.

Speak up. Don’t overlook the publicity value of writing letters to the editor. If a magazine or newspaper does an article that covers your area of expertise, respond. Keep in mind that most people write letters only when they’re angry. You can use this same simple tool to praise or add another insight to an article. Make sure you also incorporate your qualifications for speaking up (e.g., “As a longtime resident of this community,” “As someone who has studied tai chi for two decades,” etc.).

Network. Let your peers and fellow professionals know you’re available to give talks, to participate in panel discussions and so forth.

Stay light. Keep a playful attitude about publicity — especially if you find yourself misquoted, relegated to the back page or mercilessly edited.

Recycle. Find ways to reuse your material. Turn a magazine article into a talk, submit a tip sheet to different markets, record a workshop and sell it as a CD set.

Resource. Get a copy of Marcia Yudkin’s 6 Steps to Free Publicity, which will give you the nuts-and-bolts information you need, along with firing up your enthusiasm and giving you new ideas for broadening your visibility.

There’s more where this came from.

How do you become a household name? The simple answer: by relentlessly getting your message out, by generating publicity for yourself, by finding new ways to package information.

While this can be a time-consuming activity, having a monthly goal can keep you moving forward. Here are some basic activities to include:

Find a role model. Several are even better. They don’t have to be experts in your field, but they do have to be experts that you admire. Analyze how they’ve built their careers. It’s fascinating to see how others have done it — and it makes the process seem less daunting.

Have a current photograph taken — one you really like. People will remember you more easily if they have a face to connect with a name. When you have a picture you like, put it on your brochure, offer it to publications that are printing your articles, use it on flyers for seminars and events, and post it on your web site.

Compile a media mailing list. Keep adding to it as you find new sources that might be appropriate for you. Include local and national newspapers and magazines, names of reporters who write about your field, and radio and television interview programs that use experts as guests.

Speak up. Don’t overlook the publicity value of writing letters to the editor. If a magazine or newspaper does an article that covers your area of expertise, respond. Keep in mind that most people write letters only when they’re angry. You can use this same simple tool to praise or add another insight to an article. Make sure you also incorporate your qualifications for speaking up (e.g., “As a longtime resident of this community,” “As someone who has studied tai chi for two decades,” etc.).

Network. Let your peers and fellow professionals know you’re available to give talks, to participate in panel discussions and so forth.

Stay light. Keep a playful attitude about publicity — especially if you find yourself misquoted, relegated to the back page or mercilessly edited.

Recycle. Find ways to reuse your material. Turn a magazine article into a talk, submit a tip sheet to different markets, record a workshop and sell it as a CD set.

Resource. Get a copy of Marcia Yudkin’s 6 Steps to Free Publicity, which will give you the nuts-and-bolts information you need, along with firing up your enthusiasm and giving you new ideas for broadening your visibility.

There’s more where this came from.
Order Winning Ways now!

Order Winning Ways now!